3.1 - Workbook Step 1: Selection of themes

This step is the most important step, and the designated issues and objectives are automatically taken up in the Monitoring Worksheets for each of the project or programme's phases.

This step involves designating in columns D, E and F of the Overall Monitoring Worksheet:

  1. selected issues (designated 'I') and objectives (designated 'O');
  2. their priority.




Some selected themes would be given greater importance by designating them as issues, not objectives.
For an issue it is necessary to understand the impacts being taken into account and the way they are handled. For an objective it is necessary to understand the target, which implies being able to measure progress using verifiable outcomes.
The approach taken can be radically different depending upon the project or programme's importance and context. For instance, a built asset subject to a public inquiry may seek excellence and in turn state-of-the art engagements without a thorough evaluation of the financial implications.
It is recommended to limit the number of objectives to help in understanding the issues, their solutions, the responses made and the monitoring of performance.
Workbook Step 1: record in the Overall Monitoring Worksheet the selected issues (designated 'I') and objectives (designated 'O') and their priority.

3.2 - Workbook Step 2: Frameworks, Performance and Assessment

With issues, objectives and their priority entered one has a global understanding of the immediate undertakings for sustainable development and can now establish a fairly accurate estimate of the effort needed to complete the Overall Monitoring Worksheet.

For each chosen issue and objective it is now necessary to consider the performance target, its method of evaluation and the eventual benchmark.

This these steps involve designating in columns G, H and I of the Overall Monitoring Worksheet:

  • reference frameworks taken into consideration;
  • expected performance;
  • assessment methodology.

3.2.1 - Reference frameworks

In choosing one or more reference frameworks for each selected issue or objective, several criteria are recommended:

International and readily available documentation in several languages.
A documented and reasonably large body of information indicating best practice and giving case examples.
Sufficiently generic so as to be able to be applied in all likely cases and all phases of the project or programme.
Allows a good understanding by incorporating a precise vocabulary without being too dogmatic or using jargon and difficult-to-understand technical terms.
To be efficient over the long-term because those who monitor objectives until the asset's end-of-life will probably not be the same as those who made decisions at the start.
Sufficiently precise and well defined that the framework can be used to generate reliable performance targets and benchmarks.
A framework may be a part of a larger framework.


3.2.2 - Expected performance

To indicate the expected perfomance in the Overall Monitoring Worksheet (column 'H') one needs to analyse possible performance targets for the expected outcome. Performance targets may be either qualitative (e.g., power consumed) or quantitative (e.g., level of comfort).

In choosing expected performance targets for each selected issue or objective, several criteria are recommended:

Select wherever possible performance targets that are relatively straightforward to implement and follow up.
Although reference frameworks and their accompanying performance targets, inplied or otherwise, are often international, one must be pragmatic to be efficient over the long-term because those who monitor objectives until a project or programme's end-of-life will probably not be the same as those who made decisions at the start.
Generally speaking, a single target for the expected performance is envisaged for a given issue or objective. More than one target may be selected if it seems not to be too difficult to implement them in parallel. It is useful to recall that it is possible to choose a single target in the first instance before considering a second issue later. The choice will depend upon the local context.
The level of detail for the entries in the workbook's 'Expected performance' column needs to be established early on and in such a way that a) entries can be adjusted to meet various needs, and b) all stakeholders are in agreement.
It is necessary to define an expected performance that is both a) relevant and b) can be evaluated in a more-or-less generic manner at every phase of the project or programme, especially since the method used to evaluate the expected performance will change. See the accompanying relevance checklist.
The existance of an internationally recognised benchmark for a performance target often implies that a) the indicator comes from an official recommendation derived from either a standard or an industry recommendation; and b) there is an approved protocol or procedure for assessing the performance target. Since a standard benchmark which is relevant will facilitate a) understanding, b) its application and c) the data generated can probably be consolidated to draw some overall conclusions, it is strongly recommended selecting performance targets that have benchmarks.




A Relevance Checklist

A checklist to verify that a target for the expected performance is relevant and applicable at all phases of the project or programme.

Are the performance requirements included in the planning documentation?
How are the performance requirements integrated in the design? What performance guarantees can the designer provide with respect to meeting and maintaining the targets?
Do the completed works meet the designer's requirements? Have there been reservations by the designer and others about keeping the issues or objectives? Does the designer agree with the contractor's implementation? Does the contractor agree with the proposed design? What performance guarantees can the contractor provide in relation to meeting and maintaining performance targets?
Does the outcome of the measures taken correspond to the expected outcome? Is any difference acceptable? What needs to be re-examined? If the outcomes are as expected, does this mean that all the operating conditions corresponded to what was planned?
Does the analysis of the components that led to achieving the target performance explain an eventual loss in performance (e.g., the aging of materials)? What has been learnt?

3.2.3 - Assessment Methodology

To indicate in the Overall Monitoring Worksheet (column 'H') the assessment methodology for the target for the expected performance one needs to apply similar criteria to those used for performance targets.

Select wherever possible assessment methodologies that are relatively straightforward to implement and follow up.
Although reference frameworks and any accompanying assessment methodologies are often international, one must be pragmatic to be efficient over the long-term because those who monitor objectives until a project or programme's end-of-life will probably not be the same as those who made decisions at the start.
The level of detail for the entries in the workbook's 'Assessment methodology' column needs to be established early on and in such a way that a) entries can be adjusted to meet various needs, and b) all stakeholders are in agreement.
It is necessary to define assessment methodologies that are both a) relevant and b) can be evaluated in a more-or-less generic manner at every phase of the project or programme, especially since the method used to evaluate the expected performance will change.
The existance of an internationally recognised benchmark for a performance target often implies that a) that there is an assessment methodology coming from an official recommendation derived from either a standard or an industry recommendation.


Workbook Step 2: record in the Overall Monitoring Worksheet for each chosen issue and objective the reference framework, the expected performance and its assessment methodology.